Charles Goodnight Exhibition

It is our desire to share this exhibition free of licensing fees to museums who value fine art and recognize Charles Goodnight’s role in Texas’ history.

“The stunning oil paintings in this collection are carefully researched, accurate interpretations of significant moments in Charles Goodnight’s life, rendered by Master artist Lee Cable. Each painting is accompanied by a formative sketch along with written narratives describing the characters, events, and how the sketch was used in the final painting. This extraordinary portfolio with story boards will provide the host venue with an excellent opportunity to create educational programs about Texas history, and one of its most exciting, and colorful characters.”

DeVere Burt, Director Emeritus, The Cincinnati Museum of Natural History 

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To date there are ten paintings with accompanying pencil sketches for each and a small story board.

In 1878 Goodnight captured a bull Buffalo calf which was later named Old Sikes {Sykes}. This Buffalo became his breeding bull to help reestablish the Buffalo. Old Sikes had no respect for fences or gate. He would disappear for months harassing neighboring cattle and horses.

In the early spring of 1886, Charles decided to bring Old Sikes back to the ranch for good. Grabbing his Mexican spurs, bull-whip he had plaited himself, and his fastest horse, he rode out to drive the troublesome Buffalo back to the JA Ranch. Old Sikes had other ideas. He charged Goodnight and chased him all the way back to the ranch. Goodnight was running for his life.

Exhibition List

Quanah Parker • 24x30 oil on linen
Finding Cynthia Ann Parker • 30x24 oil on linen
Horsehead Crossing • 30x24 oil on linen
Dash With Cash • 28x40 oil on linen
Driven From the Palo Duro • 30x40 oil on linen
Over The Edge • 30x40 oil on linen
Gold Rush • 24x24 oil on linen
A Promise Made, a Promise Kept • 30x48 oil on linen
A Good Idea Gone Bad • 30x24 oil on linen

Lee Cable “Goodnight”

By Bob Bahr   Painting historical scenes from one of America's favorite real-life stories can mean you don’t get a lot of leeway in how you depict things. But SKB's key cowboy found a way to thread the needle. Lee Cable was approached by Jim Parkman about...